Increased Precautions We're Taking in Response to the Coronavirus
As updates on the impact of the coronavirus continue to be released, we want to take a moment to inform you of the heightened preventative measures we have put in place at Village Behavioral Health Treatment Center to keep our patients, their families, and our employees safe. All efforts are guided by and in adherence to the recommendations distributed by the CDC.

Please note that for the safety of our patients, their families, and our staff, on-site visitation is no longer allowed at Village Behavioral Health Treatment Center.

  • This restriction has been implemented in compliance with updated corporate and state regulations to further reduce the risks associated with COVID-19.
  • We are offering visitation through telehealth services so that our patients can remain connected to their loved ones.
  • Alternate methods of communication for other services are being vetted and may be offered when deemed clinically appropriate.

For specific information regarding these changes and limitations, please contact us directly.

CDC updates are consistently monitored to ensure that all guidance followed is based on the latest information released.

  • All staff has received infection prevention and control training.
  • Thorough disinfection and hygiene guidance has been provided.
  • Patient care supplies such as masks and hand sanitizer are being monitored and utilized.
  • Temperature and symptom screening protocols are in place for all patients and staff.
  • Social distancing strategies have been implemented to ensure that patients and staff maintain proper distance from one another at all times.
  • Cleaning service contracts have been reviewed for additional support.
  • Personal protective equipment items are routinely checked to ensure proper and secure storage.
  • CDC informational posters are on display to provide important reminders on proper infection prevention procedures.
  • We are in communication with our local health department to receive important community-specific updates.

The safety of our patients, their families, and our employees is our top priority, and we will remain steadfast in our efforts to reduce any risk associated with COVID-19.

The CDC has provided a list of easy tips that can help prevent the spread of the coronavirus.

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue and then immediately dispose of the tissue.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose, and mouth.
  • Clean and disinfect objects and surfaces that are frequently touched.
  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • Stay home when you are sick, except to get medical care.

For detailed information on COVID-19, please visit https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/index.html

Causes, Symptoms & Effects of Adjustment Disorder

No one experiences adjustment disorder the same way as someone else. Understanding the signs, symptoms and side effects of adjustment disorder is a key component toward starting the recovery journey.

Understanding Adjustment Disorder

Learn about adjustment disorder

Changing schools, moving to a different city, or the addition of another child to the family can bring about stress. Most people are able to adjust to these changes within a few months. However, some individuals continue to feel depressed and have a hard time coping with the change, which may suggest the presence of an adjustment disorder. An adjustment disorder is a type of stress-related mental illness. It is a short-term emotional or behavioral reaction to a known stressful event or change in an adolescent’s life that is considered an unhealthy, maladaptive, or unexpected response. In order to be diagnosed with this disorder, the response must occur within three months of the identified stressful change or event in a teen’s life and tend to resolve within six months following the event.

Adjustment disorder, sometimes called “situational depression,” often causes children to be fearful, hopeless, and lose interest in school or friends. However, unlike major depression, adjustment disorder is triggered by an external stimuli and remits once the child has processed and adapted to the situation.

While some stressful events can resolve on their own and the symptoms of the disorder dissipate over time, there are a number of repeated stressful situations that cannot be avoided and remain a part of a teen’s life. Many people tend to believe that adjustment disorder is somehow less serious than other mental health problems simply because it is a stress-related condition. Just like other mental health disorders, adjustment disorders can impact every facet of a growing teen’s life, leaving them feeling overwhelmed, stressed, hopeless, and unable to complete their normal daily activities. Early recognition and treatment are important for those who have adjustment disorder so they can learn to cope with stress, lifestyle changes, and develop the skills necessary to process their emotions.

Statistics

Adjustment disorder statistics

Adjustment disorders are very common among children and adolescents, occurring with equal frequency among boys and girls. Adjustment disorders occur in all cultures, however cultural influences may impact the type of stressor and symptoms experienced. Children and teens of all ages experience adjustment disorder, however, it’s thought that the symptoms of the disorder will vary between children and adults. Adults may experience a more emotional reaction while children and adolescents often act out.

Causes and Risk Factors

Causes and risk factors for adjustment disorder

Adjustment disorders are very common among children and adolescents, occurring with equal frequency among boys and girls. Adjustment disorders occur in all cultures, however cultural influences may impact the type of stressor and symptoms experienced. Children and teens of all ages experience adjustment disorder, however, it’s thought that the symptoms of the disorder will vary between children and adults. Adults may experience a more emotional reaction while children and adolescents often act out.

Signs and Symptoms

Signs and symptoms of adjustment disorder

The symptoms of adjustment disorder will vary from one individual to the next and the symptoms one experiences may be different in another. However, all individuals with this disorder experience symptoms within three months of a stressful event and the reaction to that stressor causes significant impairment in social, occupational, or educational functioning. Signs and symptoms of adjustment disorder may affect how you feel and think about yourself and life. Some of the symptoms of adjustment disorder may include:

Behavioral Symptoms:

  • Tearfulness
  • Engaging in self-destructive behaviors
  • Withdrawing from friends and previously-enjoyed activities
  • Increasing amounts of time spent alone
  • Increased absences from school
  • Using drugs or alcohol
  • Skipping school
  • Fighting
  • Acting out

Physical Symptoms:

  • Muscle tension
  • Aches and pains
  • Nausea and vomiting
  • Diarrhea
  • Headaches
  • Changes in appetite
  • Different sleep patterns
  • Heart palpitations
  • Fatigue, lack of energy

Cognitive Symptoms:

  • Inability to focus on particular tasks
  • Feeling overwhelmed

Psychosocial Symptoms:

  • Depressed mood
  • Worrying
  • Jitteriness
  • Fear of separation from important figures in child’s life
  • Feeling hopeless
  • Mood swings
  • Nervousness
  • Aggressive outbursts
  • Anxiety
  • Stress
  • Suicidal thoughts

Effects

Effects of adjustment disorder

While most cases of adjustment disorder resolve on their own within six months of the event, some children and adolescents could experience long-lasting effects that have been caused by this disorder. These long-term effects may include:

  • Insomnia
  • Social isolation and withdrawal
  • Marital or family conflicts
  • Decreased capacity to work
  • Substance abuse
  • Alcoholism
  • Schizophrenia
  • Depression
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Behavioral changes
  • Mood swings
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Antisocial personality disorder
  • Self-harm
  • Suicidal thoughts and behaviors

Co-Occurring Disorders

Adjustment disorder and co-occurring disorders

Adjustment disorder can accompany almost any mental disorder or medical disorder. Some of the most common co-occurring disorders may include:

  • Depression
  • Obsessive-compulsive disorder
  • Bipolar disorder
  • Many medical conditions

An Ideal Place to Heal

With a serene environment, individualized treatment plans, engaging activities, and top-of-the-line education for each adolescent, Village Behavioral Health sets itself apart as a treatment center that makes positive change in each child’s life.

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